Year 11 Revision

In Year 11, students will be fully supported in understanding the content and concepts they need for the exam. However, due to the range of knowledge they will need to recall, it is vital that students start revising at home at the earliest opportunity.

In order to support students in this revision, each subject has designed a revision timetable, taking students up to the final weeks before an exam. This shows students the areas they should cover, week by week, and which resources / activities would best support them.

As a parent, this is particularly useful, to see what your son / daughter should be revising for in any particular week.

All students will have this timeline provided already, by each subject.

We have summarised the timeline, so that you can have an overview of what they should cover in each subject.

Click here to see the overview for Option subjects
Click here to see the overview for Core subjects

We have also provided the more detailed timelines that teachers have given to students, including the resources they should refer to.

Click here to see Revision timelines by subject

How much time should students spend revising?
Each night, students should revise in 20-25 minute blocks, with a 5 to 10 minute gap in between. They should do this at least 4 times in an evening - which means a minimum of 2 hours revising, including breaks. As students get towards Easter, they may need to revise for longer. At the weekend, students will want to plan in some 'recreation time', but will want to revise for one whole day, or two half days. This will usually mean a further 4 to 6 hours over a weekend, as a minimum.

How do I divide my week up?
Use your homework timetable to work out when to revise for each subject. You may want to add more subjects for each night, particularly the subjects that have the most content to get through.

How do I know the revision is successful?
The simple answer is that you remember the key content, or can explain key concepts or ideas. The best way to do this is to memorise this information: look, cover, say / write, check. Other ways include science DRIP sheets, which allow someone else to question you. Avoid just reading through your notes - this will only make you think you are familiar with the ideas. You may have remembered very little. Whatever you revise, test yourself in some way - through answering exam questions, writing down key points, listing facts under topic headings, or saying it aloud.

I don't seem to remember this after a week!
Just because you have covered a topic once, doesn't mean that you have created the links in your memory to get that information out quickly, or in full. You will need to recap on anything you have revised that week - usually at the weekend; or everything you have covered in a term, usually in the half term break. Start every session by making yourself recall what you looked at the last time you revised for that subject.

Having a structure to follow, week by week, will take the anxiety out of what to cover, and whether you are doing enough. You will never remove the anxiety caused by exams, completely - ask any teacher about their own experience. However, a small amount of anxiety is useful to make sure that you keep on track. Please ensure that you speak with your parents, tutor or your teacher if you feel that any of your work is becoming overwhelming, so they can help you prioritise your work, and get back in control again.

Mr D Phillips
Deputy Headteacher - Curriculum and Assessment
Norton Hill School and Somervale School